Seminars

Wednesday, Feb 19 at 4:10 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Gabriela Gonzalez, Louisiana State University
Gravitational waves astronomy

Abstract:  The first detection of gravitational waves in 2015 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, created by the merger of black holes more than a billion years ago, was followed by several other signals from black holes. In 2017, the merger of neutron stars was detected by LIGO and Virgo detectors and by gamma-ray telescopes, and was found by many electromagnetic observations too: a new era of gravitational wave astrophysics has started with very bright prospects for the future. In April 2019, LIGO and Virgo started taking data again, and many more merging black holes and neutron stars have been discovered. We will describe the technology involved in the LIGO gravitational wave detectors, details of the latest discoveries and the exciting prospects for more detections in the next years.

Thursday, Feb 20 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Simon Giraud, Michigan State University
Study of core-collapse supernovae : New experimental constrains on the nuclear physics inputs

Abstract:  To model the composition of the core of a massive star during its collapse, a treatment of the nuclear statistical equilibrium, starting from a single-nucleus approximation equation of state (Lattimer and Swesty, LS), has been built recently. This allows a more realistic description of the nuclear distribution inside the core and, more specifically, to quantify the role of the nuclear masses. The distributions obtained with the original mass functional (LS) and those obtained with HFB-24 and DZ10 mass models have been compared for several thermodynamic conditions of a typical CCSN trajectory. The differences in the composition could lead up to approximately 25% deviations in the electron-capture rate, thus showing the need to identify a proper mass model to use in CCSN simulations. Therefore, new high precision mass measurements in the nuclear mass region of interest, via a double Penning trap at the IGISOL facility (Jyvaskyla, Finland), were performed. Five new mass excess were determined for the following nuclei : 69m,70Co, 74,75Ni and 76mCu. The precision has been improved for five others : 67Fe, 69Co, 76,78Cu and 79mZn. The experimental values of the nuclear gaps for Z=28 and N=50 have been compared with the results predicted by DZ10 and HFB-24. The latter model better reproduces the evolution of these gaps. Despite the different predictions of DZ10 and HFB-24, a moderated impact of the mass model on the composition of the collapsing core was found after implementing the recent statistical treatment in an existing CCSN hydrodynamical simulation. Moreover, those differences in composition have a small effect on the collapse dynamics, which appears to be more sensitive to the electron-capture model. The latter can be better constrained by means of nuclear charge exchange experiments. The upcoming 14O(d,2He)14N charge exchange experiment using the AT-TPC should demonstrate a very promising way of constraining the electron capture rates of the exotic nuclei capturing the most during the CCSN.

Friday, Feb 21 at 5:30 AM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Imjeong Choi and Minhae Lee,
Cello piano duo concert

Abstract:  Performers Imjeong Choi (cello) Imjeong Choi is a South Korean cellist. She graduated from Hanyang University in Seoul, South Korea, with a bachelor of music degree, in addition to receiving an education of music degree. In South Korea, Choi worked in Boseong Girl's Middle School as a cello teacher, and completed an internship at Muhak Middle School. She received first prize in the Hanyang Chamber Music Competition, and was a member of the Seoul Metropolitan Youth Orchestra. In the United States, Choi earned her master's degree in cello performance at MSU in 2019. She spent a summer working in the Ohio Light Opera, and she participated in MSU Summer Study Abroad in Todi, Italy, where she held a performance. She also toured Hong Kong, China, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Japan as a member of the Asian Youth Orchestra. Since 2018, Choi has been a member of the Midland Symphony Orchestra. Currently, Choi is pursuing her doctor of musical arts degree in cello performance at MSU, where she studies with Suren Bagratuni. Minhae Lee (piano) Pianist Minhae Lee is the winner of the Chicago North Shore Musicians Club scholarship, the Honors Concerto Competition at Michigan State University (MSU), the New Tang Dynasty Television International Piano Competition, the "Golden Classical Music Awards" International Competition, the Taegu Broadcasting Corporation Daegu Broadcasting Corporation Competition, and the Daejin University Piano Competition. Lee completed her bachelor's and master's degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. She also attended the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University, and the Manhattan School of Music, where she was awarded a full scholarship to study with Dr. Solomon Mikowsky. As a collaborative pianist, she has held a position of collaborative pianist staff at the Jeju International Brass Competition, Manhattan, in the Mountain Summer Festival, Manhattan School of Music, Michigan State University, and the Aspen Music Summer Festival. Minhae Lee is an adjunct faculty member at Alma College, and is a piano faculty member of the Community Music School at Michigan State University, in addition to giving lessons for the Aspen Music Summer Festival Passes and Lessons Scholarship program. She holds a doctoral degree in piano performance from MSU, where she is currently completing her second doctoral degree in collaborative piano, and her second master's degree in piano pedagogy.

Monday, Feb 24 at 2:00 PM
1400 Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building
Elias Aydi and Jaspreet Randhawa,
JINA-CEE Science Cafe

Abstract:  "Nova eruptions powered by shocks" and "Search for 511 KeV gamma-rays from Novae and uncertainty in 18F(p,alpha) reaction rate"

Thursday, Feb 27 at 6:00 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Trudy Kortes, NASA
Hard realities you will face in industry and the strategies you need to deal with them

Abstract:  In this talk, "Leadership in an Engineering Environment," Trudy Kortes, a 30-year NASA veteran and STEM speaker and consultant, will describe the typical characteristics of an industrial engineering organization, the typical characteristics of engineers, and typical situations you might find yourself in within an engineering organization. She will discuss the hard realities you will face as well as manifestations of each of these topics, and then you will learn strategies, approaches, and coping mechanisms to successfully maneuver yourself through your career. Consider this an investment in your future self.

Friday, Feb 28 at 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Agnes Mocsy , Pratt Institute
Physics in concert with the arts

Abstract:  In this journey we will depart from the often-present science-art dichotomy, exploring the complicated, often-unexpected relationship that physics and the arts share. This complex relationship provides opportunities for fresh storytelling, in particular, physics narratives embedded in a wider culture and interdisciplinary explorations. I will also argue that science acting in concert with the arts can deliver benefits beyond science communication: Addressing questions of social justice as influence for a more equitable world.

Friday, Feb 28 at 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Agnes Mocsy, Pratt Institute, NY
Physics in concert with the arts

Abstract:  In this journey we will depart from the often-present science-art dichotomy, exploring the complicated, often-unexpected relationship that physics and the arts share. This complex relationship provides opportunities for fresh storytelling, in particular, physics narratives embedded in a wider culture and interdisciplinary explorations. I will also argue that science acting in concert with the arts can deliver benefits beyond science communication: Addressing questions of social justice as influence for a more equitable world

Thursday, Mar 12 at 2:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Jon Howard, ASET Program
Thermal-hydraulic characterization of shell-side flow in a cryogenic coiled finned-tube heat exchanger

Abstract:  Coiled finned-tube heat exchangers, also called Collins type heat exchangers, are frequently used in small to medium scale cryogenic systems to improve design packaging (compactness) while maintaining high thermal effectiveness. A typical heat exchanger assembly of this kind consists of an inner cylindrical shell, called the mandrel, with helical finned-tube coils wrapped around it, and then enclosed by an outer shell. The two flow paths are through the helically wrapped tube, and the annular flow around the outside of the tubes. An accurate description of the shell-side thermal-hydraulic flow characteristics is a necessary part of the heat exchanger design. In this paper, these characteristics for cryogenic gaseous nitrogen, between 300 to 100 K, are numerically investigated. A computational fluid dynamics model of the shell-side geometry is developed and validated. Simulations are carried out for a wide range of flow conditions. Data obtained from the numerical simulations are used to form correlations between the shell-side Reynolds number (Re), Fanning friction factor (f), and Chilton-Colburn factor (j). In addition, the effect of geometrical variance on the correlation was investigated. The results from this study show reasonable agreement between the correlations developed numerically and experimental data.