Seminars

Tuesday, Nov 27 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Professor Lougovski, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Quantum computing and subatomic physics: State of the art, challenges, and prospects

Abstract:  Simulations of complex many-body quantum phenomena present a formidable computational challenge. Quantum computing holds promise to drastically improve our simulations capabilities for many-body systems across all scientific domains. We discuss recent progress and challenges in quantum simulations of light nuclei (the deuteron 2H, the triton 3H, 3He, and the alpha particle 4He ) and a prototypical quantum field theory---the Schwinger model---on a multitude of quantum hardware ranging from superconducting circuits and trapped ions to photonics. Our results illustrate the potential of quantum computers to augment classical computations in bridging the scales from quarks to nuclei.

Wednesday, Nov 28 at 4:10 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
B. Alex Brown, Michigan State University
Energy-density-functional results for magic nuclei and the extrapolations to the nuclear matter equations of state

Abstract:  In this talk I will discuss results from the seven papers given below and their interconnections. They are based upon determining the parameters used in energy-density-functional calculations from binding energies, root-mean-square charge radii, and nucleon separation energies, of magic nuclei including 48Ni and 100Sn. The results are used to make extrapolations to nuclear matter equations of state (EOS) including the symmetry energy and the neutron matter EOS. I will discuss the connections of these EOS to the neutron skin, and the differences in the charge radii of mirror nuclei. I will review some recent related work including those from neutron-star mergers.

Monday, Dec 03 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Kevin Fossez, Michigan State University
Title to be announced

Abstract:  To be announced

Monday, Dec 03 at 1:00 PM
1400 Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building
MacKenzie Warren and Rachel Titus , Michigan State University
JINA-CEE Science Cafe
Wednesday, Dec 05 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Linda Hlophe, Michigan State University
Title to be announced

Abstract:  To be announced

Wednesday, Dec 05 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Mario Gomez Ramos,
Title to be announced

Abstract:  To be announced

Thursday, Dec 06 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Caroline Robin, Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Title to be announced

Abstract:  To be announced

Friday, Dec 07 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Wendell Misch, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Title to be announced

Abstract:  To be announced

Friday, Dec 07 at 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory
Martyna Chruslinska, Radboud University
Local merger rates of double neutron star systems and related puzzles

Abstract:  The first detection of gravitational waves from a merging double neutron star (DNS) binary challenged our understanding of evolution of its potential progenitor systems, implying a much higher rate of DNS coalescences in the local Universe than predicted on theoretical grounds. Those theoretical estimates for the isolated binary evolution scenario are usually based on results from population synthesis calculations. The wide range of values for the calculated merger rates often quoted in population synthesis studies reflects our limited knowledge of the details of evolution and interactions of massive stars in binaries, which one can hope to improve by confrontation with the observational limits. In the era of gravitational wave observations this becomes a promising tool to learn about the formation of merging systems. However, this comparison is far from being straightforward. Binaries that merge within the local Universe originate from progenitor systems that formed at different redshifts and in various environments. The efficiency of formation of double compact objects is highly sensitive to metallicity of the star formation. Therefore, to confront the theoretical estimates with observational limits resulting from gravitational waves observations one has to account for the formation and evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe. This introduces another layer of uncertainty to those calculations that needs to be better understood.

Monday, Dec 10 at 12:30 PM
1400 Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building
James Lattimer, Stony Brook University
JINA-CEE Seminar - Title to be announced
Tuesday, Dec 11 at 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
To be announced ,
Theory Seminar - Title to be announced